It poured rain overnight, which turned the trail into a primordial stew, but the dawn was shining brightly when I woke up. The flying dragons from last night had returned to wherever dragons spend their days, so I quickly packed and got on my way. A short distance down the trail was Page Pond but there was no sign of Eric and Michael. After climbing for a while, I reached Wocket Ledge and enjoyed a nice view back towards the White Mountains. Wocket Ledge also marked the 1,900-mile mark on my A.T. thru-hike, but there was nothing there, other than the lovely view, to commemorate the milestone.

Appalachian Trail

View From Wocket Ledge

 

Once past the lovely Dream Lake, the trail along the ridgeline became a nearly impassable jumble of root, rocks, mud, and standing water. Hiking through this section was not only time consuming, but my shoes were soon soaked despite my best efforts to keep them dry. After several miles of struggling through the terrain, I started the 1,000-foot climb to the top of Mt Success, the last peak in the Mahoosuc Range in New Hampshire.

Appalachian Trail

Slippery Morning Climb

 

Appalachian Trail

The Well-Named Dream Lake

 

Appalachian Trail

Actual Trail Footage

 

Appalachian Trail

No Avoidance Possible

 

Appalachian Trail

Many Have Gone Before Me

 

The summit of Mt Success is covered with an interesting mixture of granite slabs interspersed with alpine bogs. Because of the low growing alpine shrubbery, there are many spots with decent views but the star here is the terrain itself. Miles of bog bridges along the summit ridge help to protect the delicate and rare alpine plants.

Appalachian Trail

View From Mt Success

 

Appalachian Trail

Alpine Ridge

 

Appalachian Trail

Miles Of Bog Bridges

 

Descending from Mt Success, I caught up with Eric and Michael who told me about the fantastic campsite that they discovered on Page Pond. I asked them if they had heard any pterodactyls flying around last night and they looked at me like I had spent too much time on the trail. After walking together for a few minutes, we arrived at the New Hampshire/Maine border where we took turns taking pictures of each other at the border sign. I’m having difficulty believing that I have just entered Maine, the 14th and final state on my thru-hike.

Appalachain Trail

Sliding Down The Mountain

 

Appalachian Trail

Michael & Eric

 

By the time we finished our border crossing celebration, it was already after 4:00 pm. My goal was to reach the Full Goose Shelter which is perfectly located for launching an assault on the legendary Mahoosuc Notch and Mahoosuc Arm in the morning. But, once again, I’m feeling worn out and exhausted and feel certain that I can’t cover those five miles to the shelter before dark. Eric and Michael are feeling the same way so we pulled into the nearby Carlo Col Shelter and Campsite.

Appalachian Trail

View Near Carlos Col

 

The Carlo Col Campsite is very pretty with several dispersed wooden platforms for tents. I selected a nice secluded spot to set up my tent while Eric and Michael found an area closer to the shelter where they set up camp. As if the rocky 0.3-mile side trail to get to the campsite wasn’t enough, it was a steep downhill climb to get to the spring for water. After preparing and eating dinner, I was sitting in my tent cleaning up when a young boy of elementary school age approached my campsite. Apparently, I had left my cup down by the spring and he was going around to the different tents trying to find the owner. I thanked him profusely. I don’t carry anything “extra” and replacing gear in the wilderness, as you might imagine, is somewhat difficult.

Appalachian Trail

Checking For Pterodactyls

 

Appalachian Trail

Home For The Night

 

Date: August 13, 2017
Starting Location: Trident Col Campsite
Ending Location: Carlos Col Shelter & Campsite
AT Miles Today: 10.1
AT Miles To Date: 1,908.5